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Can Lizards get ticks?

Printed From: Reptiles and Amphibians of the UK
Category: Herpetofauna Native to the UK
Forum Name: Common Lizard
Forum Description: Forum for all issues concerning Lacerta vivipara
URL: http://www.herpetofauna.co.uk/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=3869
Printed Date: 21 Apr 2019 at 7:47am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 11.06 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Can Lizards get ticks?
Posted By: Adderz
Subject: Can Lizards get ticks?
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 6:24pm
Hi All,
 
Just wondering if Common Lizards can be bitten by ticks? The Common Lizard in this picture seems to have something behind its front leg and I am not really sure of what else it could be. It was in Scotland so there would have been plenty of ticks around.
 
Cheers for your thoughts!
 
Rob 


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I started out with nothing and I've still got most of it left....



Replies:
Posted By: Iowarth
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 7:27pm

Hi Rob

Yeap, they certainly can. We see them a lot on Common Lizards and Sand Lizards down here, especially when there are deer around. Certainly these appear to be fairly typical ticks.

Chris



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Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)


Posted By: Richard2
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 9:21pm
I've noticed that the ticks nearly always seem to be in that position, just behind the front legs. I wonder why. Is it the warmest part of the body?


Posted By: Iowarth
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 10:02pm

I should imagine it is simply that this is the main position which combines relatively soft scalation with the inability of the lizard to remove them. If a tick attached further back on the body the lizard would simply turn round and nibble it off!! Certainly seen them doing this with mites.

Chris 



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Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)


Posted By: Richard2
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 10:09pm
Interesting - that certainly makes sense. I suppose it's also the position in which the ticks are most sheltered from being snagged as the lizard moves through vegetation.


Posted By: Richard2
Date Posted: 07 Sep 2011 at 10:13pm
I don't remember seeing them on snakes. Have you? Could be because they'd be forced off as the snake went through thick stalks and roots.


Posted By: GemmaJF
Date Posted: 08 Sep 2011 at 5:03pm
I've seen ticks on grass snakes that were otherwise debilitated or poorly. I'm guessing perhaps a healthy snake which regularly sloughs would be fairly tick free, whereas one in very poor condition may not be sloughing.


Posted By: AGILIS
Date Posted: 09 Sep 2011 at 8:02am
Here is a pic of a juvenile La with a tic on its arm pit that was basking at Stoborough in May, Is a dab of parrafin on the ticks body still a good method of treatment as its not advised to bust tick due to infection as tick dies with head still in the skin?? keith



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   LOCAL ICYNICAL CELTIC ECO WARRIOR AND FAILED DRUID


Posted By: Liz Heard
Date Posted: 09 Sep 2011 at 5:12pm
without wishing to state the obvious, its worth bearing in mind that humans can get ticks too. and that they carry a nasty disease (Lyme's).
a mate of mine (a deer stalker) has got it. he diagnosed himself by researching his symptoms on the net and then having it confirmed by his GP.
from what hes told me, its pretty nasty and very debilitating, so beware herpers!


Posted By: GemmaJF
Date Posted: 09 Sep 2011 at 6:10pm
Certainly worth 'de-ticking' after being in bracken for the day. I've had a few!


Posted By: Adderz
Date Posted: 14 Sep 2011 at 8:10pm
Wow, cheers for the info everyone. Great to learn stuff from peoples personal experiences, beats any book!
 
Rob


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I started out with nothing and I've still got most of it left....


Posted By: Jane_Whitt
Date Posted: 28 Sep 2011 at 7:46am
Ticks are not as numerous, with fewer than ten different species, but can cause much more damage that the mites as they can lead to some serious illnesses, serious, and that means not only for the lizard, but also for the owner, so great care must be taken when removing ticks. Tick ​​removal is not for anyone who is a little delicate, and certainly not something that can stay with the job half done, so if you have any questions that you want to do the job is something best left to the vet. The only good thing both tick and mite infestation is that it is relatively easy to detect and treat. 
Tick ​​removal :
If you are not sure will be happy to tick start your lizard to the vet is best. This is a good course of action anyway, the vet can prescribe ivermectin to treat if the infestation is really bad, which is not available over the counter. As long as your lizard is comfortable with being handled, you can remove the tick yourself. There are "tick removers" that you can get at pet stores, but a pair of tweezers, with a rather long nose done. The important thing is not trying to remove a tick with your fingers and gloves at all times. Ticks can carry some pretty horrible diseases - Lyme disease is perhaps the more people know - and when he retired, it is inevitable that there will be some bleeding around the site and the jaws of the tick, and is that if the tick is accidentally crushed, which is usually the case. It may be necessary to wrap the lizard and in a perfect world this is a work of two men, so finding a friend who does not apprehensive or family member to keep the animal for you. Grasp the tick firmly by the head (not the body - you just go out and leave the mouth parts still attached, which can cause infection) and slowly pull the lizard. The tick should slide out. Never touch, this is another way in which the head is left embedded. Never try to burn the tick with a lighted cigarette end - clings tighter, not letting go. Other mechanical means will not work - pulling it with serenity and firmness is the only way and nothing but cause more problems. So that's why it's vital not to be apprehensive and make sure before you start, you can finish the job.
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Posted By: Liz Heard
Date Posted: 26 Aug 2018 at 11:13am
Hi Chris and all

Originally posted by Iowarth Iowarth wrote:



We see them a lot on Common Lizards and Sand Lizards down here, especially when there are deer around.

Chris



Hope no one minds me reviving an 'oldie' (and i don't mean giving emergency CPR to a stricken senior citizen ), but can i take from the above that of the many species, the tick our lacertids get is Ixodes scapularis, the Deer Tick?
Not that i'd know but scales being a different kettle of fish to fur, one might have expected a 'speciaist'.




   


Posted By: Iowarth
Date Posted: 27 Aug 2018 at 7:35pm
Hi Ben

Certainly the deer or sheep tick. (can't be bothered to check binomial) although the english names are interchangeable. I think a reptile specialist tick in the UK would probably be doomed to extinction. The deer/sheep tick is a real generalist though and as long as it can get its mouthparts into something that contains blood (us for example) it's happy!

All the best
Chris


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Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)


Posted By: Liz Heard
Date Posted: 31 Aug 2018 at 10:40pm
Thanks Chris.



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