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My first frogs of 2018...

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Suzi View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Feb 2018 at 10:29am
I just have the tiny rams horn snails which I like. I didn't introduce them deliberately so they must have come in on a plant. I don't have any other types. My neighbour had the large pond snails which I didn't fancy and fortunately never came my way. I'm not sure the latter did any damage but I just thought they looked too large in a garden pond. I tried to buy the Rams horns ones but couldn't find an outlet so I was rather pleased when I got some anyway.
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chubsta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chubsta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Feb 2018 at 11:12am
I think my snails have mainly come from the local canal - I did have quite a few the last couple of years but most will have 'disappeared' when the pond was drained last year, although I did manage to rescue a few. I raided the canal for weed last year and there was at least one big snail and quite a few rams horns when I put it in the pond.

A problem that I think I may still have is that the pond is lacking in terms of freshwater 'plankton' and that was the reason for many tadpoles not developing quickly enough last year, not sure what to do about that.
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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Feb 2018 at 9:41pm
I loved the footage too - no lie!!

There are lots of pond plants you could use such as Water Forget-me-not, Water Mint, Fool's Watercress and Brooklime to name a few.
I've got lots of Watercress - which also keeps me supplied with salad.

If there's no weed, newts - especially Palmates and Smooths will lay eggs just about anywhere though (against rocks etc).
Another option is to cut thin strips of bin liner and drop them in the water. It's quite exciting to look again a few days later and find them all twisted and folded over.
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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Feb 2018 at 10:35pm
Loved the footage also, seemed like a window into something we don't normally get to see. 


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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Feb 2018 at 11:53am
Yes, given how widespread, frequently encountered and relatively approachable the species is and despite it's unique and spectacular means of locomotion, footage (especially night time) of Common Frogs seems in surprisingly short supply compared to many British animals such as birds, foxes, badgers etc
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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 10:05am
They are starting to pair up in my ponds at the moment but I had my first 2018 frog spawn sighting on 29th Jan. About 35 clumps (no frogs) in a meadow pond right beside the south coast. Sadly, when i went back the next day to nab a few pics, it had all gone white.

Second sighting was on Friday (16th) near Blandford. While driving through a pretty rural hamlet, my eyes were yanked out by a beautiful village pond beside the lane (below). As i got closer (on foot) i could hear all the busy hubbub of whirring, murmuring and splashing. What pleasing music that is. One of my favourite sounds.

After a hasty count i 'guesstimated' around 140 adult frogs and 80 clumps of fresh-as-a-daisy spawn.
This pond looked ideal for breeding frogs. Fish-free, open to full sun and away from agriculture, perfectly clear, clean water, aquatic vegetation to dive under and hide from predators, and with large expanses of shallow water all around it's ever-so-gently sloping sides.
Walked around it slowly a number of times peering in, and scanned the surface for a bit but didn't spot any newts moving about/rising for air (i realise i cannot reliably conclude complete absence from this!)

Look to the edge of the far bank especially between the little tuft of rushes on the left and the patch of dead Iris stems to its right...




Here..






Apologies for the crap photos. My camera's bust so they were taken with my phone.
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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 12:40pm
Lovely to see so many frogs and so much spawn. 

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Suzi View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 2:51pm
Amazing Ben!
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chubsta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chubsta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 5:05pm
Lovely photos, can't believe there are so many frogs and so much spawn this early! Don't suppose you have any idea how the pond fairs as the weather warms up, looks almost temporary to me...
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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 5:32pm
No, 'fraid not. Not been there before - and may never return! Had the nearby churchyard looked more 'slow worm likely', i might have tried to squeeze in a revisit if i was in the area again.
Can't be sure of course, but i didn't get the impression it was an ephemeral pool myself. Although it was very shallow around the edges, there was also a 'rubber ring' present and a sign warning 'Danger Deep Water'. You couldn't get a measure of the depth in the middle from the bank.
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