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happy couple...

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will View Drop Down
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    Posted: 29 Apr 2011 at 8:55pm
...for some reason the zig-zag at Boscombe was empty of people today, so giving this happy couple more peace than usual...


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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr 2011 at 11:05pm
blinding pic will
thanks for posting.

as an aside, when we were in Boscombe last week i observed swathes of this succulent beside the zigzag. rarely visiting seaside habitat, ive never encountered it before. do you (or anyone here) happen to know what it is and if its native?
put me out of my misery and save me searching the internet/books or posting on ispot!



flowerheads are 6-7cm in diameter.

cheers
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Wolfgang Wuster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wolfgang Wuster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Apr 2011 at 9:39am
It's a hottentot fig (Carpobrotus edulis) - an invasive species native to South Africa. It's a serious pest in parts of the Mediterranean and elsewhere with a Mediterranean climate, although I guess the UK climate will control it a bit more than would be the case in warmer latitudes.
Wolfgang W├╝ster

School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor

http://pages.bangor.ac.uk/~bss166/
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will View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote will Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Apr 2011 at 9:56am
Thanks Ben; as Wolfgang says it's hottentot fig - it was indeed noticeably knocked back by the cold winter of 09/10, and to a lesser extent this winter - however it's still carpeting swathes of the cliffs and in Cornwall it's a real pest.
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David Bird View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote David Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 May 2011 at 10:02pm
Natural England have spent a lot of money over the past decade or so controlling the Hottentot fig on the Bournemouth cliffs. The patches do look reasonable reptile habitat especially with the dead dry and warm material underneath but on my cliff surveys I have found no reptiles in or around them, they also do not seem to harbour many invertebrates either. Last year I did find some of the ripe "Figs" or as the South Africans call them "Sour Figs" but found them rather salty with an unplesant bitterness  nothing really like figs.
David
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kithara Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Sep 2011 at 1:05pm
very lucky shot
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