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Couple of fungi finds

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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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    Posted: 04 Oct 2018 at 8:27pm
Hi all

Bit quiet on the forum at the mo, so here's some of my best recent fungi observations.

Lurid Bolete (Boletus luridus)

This colourful mushroom turns blue upon cutting, and can be told from the similar Boletus luridiformis by the reticulation on it's stem. These have been showing in this spot since at least the early 1990s.
The small ones with yellow stems are Rooting Bolete Boletus radicans







Boletus radicans




Chuffed to find these Silky Rosegill Volvariella bombycina as it's not that common. Grows on logs, starts off egg-like and bursts forth from a bag-like 'volva' (note 'o' not 'u'!).
Edible but would be a shame to consume an uncommon species. I left the one i picked to continue sporulating.









The Miller Clitopilus prunulus is edible, fairly common and so-called because it has a 'floury complexion'. Not one for beginners though as it could be confused with poisonous Clitocybe species. One way to tell it is the pinky-brown spore print colour (shown).





This Amanita echinocephalia find (from one of my local adder sites) was best of all, as although there are several records from my area, it's otherwise classed as uncommon/rare.
Awful pong gives this away. It's such an unforgettably unique form of vile that i can still smell it now.
Imagine industrial-strength detergent. Industrial strength detergent that's somehow gone off. One of the worst natural smells ever to blight my nostrils! , but a beautiful species.






Cheers


Edited by Liz Heard - 04 Oct 2018 at 8:51pm
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will View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote will Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Oct 2018 at 7:46am
great stuff Ben, very envious of your tremendous mycological knowledge!  That top one is a beauty, especially the abstract quality of the third photo from the top - looks like an alien landscape with red sky - could have been a Pink Floyd concert poster I reckon, or maybe I've spent too much time among the mushroomsWink..
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chubsta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chubsta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Oct 2018 at 7:53pm
Beautiful photos, the colours are fantastic! Don't know how you manage to keep track of so many different species, must be a real skill there I think! With that in mind, how about an ID on these beauties that we found in Dorset in early September...

This one was a wonderful sight, at least a foot across and in great condition - it appeared to have been there a while as a plant had grown up through it but was very soft and pliable




This one was clearly very plain but was a good size and unusual to us, although may be common, we don't see much fungi in Kent...





This one appeared one night and then seemed to have melted by the next!



Lovely and fresh looking:



And as a slight variation - are these wasp galls on an oak tree?



And even I don't need help identifying these two...



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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Oct 2018 at 2:24am
Thanks Will .
Yes, it's certainly a very photogenic species. Looks like a strange rock formation to me.
My knowledge falls far short of 'tremendous' though - I just know a bit more than some other people!

Hi Chubsta, reliably id-ing fungi (esp to species level) from photos alone can often be a very tricky business and in many instances impossible.

So now i've registered that routinely trotted out excuse, i'll give it a go

The first one is indeed gorgeous! Nice find! The habitat, the rounded shape with concentric ring markings, and what looks like a velvety upper surface suggest a a very large but young, Dyer's Mazegill Phaeolus schweinitzii.
The size is troubling though, so maybe it's a young Giant Polypore Meripilus giganteus. They can get up to a metre wide. It would be good to see how it looked a few days later. Would probably have the answer then.
Can't think of any other candidates.

The second fungus with the big 'umbo' (nipple) might be an Entoloma or possibly Tricholoma species.


I'm not massively confident on those two, but then it gets easier...

The third species that rapidly 'melted' is almost certainly a Shaggy Inkcap Coprinus comatus (your comment helped clinch it), and the last, the bracket, is very certainly a young Birch Polypore Piptoporous betulinus.

Nice range of fungi and i liked your last pic of the Tuatara too.

PS they look like they might be Oak Marble Galls or similar, but i wouldn't really know!

Cheers

Edited by Liz Heard - 06 Oct 2018 at 9:01am
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chubsta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chubsta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2018 at 7:27am
Thanks very much for the ids, makes it much more interesting to actually find out what they are. I can't imagine how much knowledge must be needed to differentiate between the species, just the fact the large one, which looks extremely distinctive to me, can be one of at least two different species shows what. again it must be to work out what they are. 

 When we were young and lived on the Isle of Wight we would regularly go out picking mushrooms to eat but these days I wouldn't even dream of doing it given how little I know about them...

BTW, here is a quick Fly Agaric, at least they are distinctive and we often go out this time of year to specifically look for them


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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2018 at 6:39am
After consideration, I now think the first one must be a young Giant Polypore. I've never seen a Dyer's Mazegill that big. This is a good example of how even a familiar fungus species can 'throw' you; they can change colour and shape dramatically as they develop.
It will have quickly enveloped the plant as it grew, rather than the plant growing through it.
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